• Chinese Optics Letters
  • Vol. 20, Issue 6, 061302 (2022)
Zhiyi Xuan1、2、3、4, Qingquan Liu1、2、3、4, Zhuangzhuang Cui1、2、4, Songlei Huang2、5, Bo Yang2、3, Chenlu Li1、2、3、4, Shaowei Wang1、2、4、6、*, and Wei Lu1、2、3、4、**
Author Affiliations
  • 1State Key Laboratory of Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083, China
  • 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
  • 3School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210, China
  • 4Shanghai Research Center for Quantum Sciences, Shanghai 201315, China
  • 5State Key Laboratories of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083, China
  • 6Nantong Academy of Intelligent Sensing, Nantong 226000, China
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    DOI: 10.3788/COL202220.061302 Cite this Article
    Zhiyi Xuan, Qingquan Liu, Zhuangzhuang Cui, Songlei Huang, Bo Yang, Chenlu Li, Shaowei Wang, Wei Lu. On-chip short-wave infrared multispectral detector based on integrated Fabry–Perot microcavities array[J]. Chinese Optics Letters, 2022, 20(6): 061302 Copy Citation Text show less

    Abstract

    We demonstrate an ultra-compact short-wave infrared (SWIR) multispectral detector chip by monolithically integrating the narrowband Fabry–Perot microcavities array with the InGaAs detector focal plane array. A 16-channel SWIR multispectral detector has been fabricated for demonstration. Sixteen different narrowband response spectra are acquired on a 64×64 pixels detector chip by four times combinatorial etching processes. The peak of the response spectra varies from 1450 to 1666 nm with full width at half-maximum of 24 nm on average. The size of the SWIR multispectral detection system is remarkably reduced to a 2 mm2 detector chip.

    1. Introduction

    Spectroscopy information is widely used to identify different matter and has a lot of applications, such as sensors[1,2], multispectral detection[36], and remote sensing[7,8]. For conventional multispectral detection systems[9,10], their wavelength division device and detector are separated and require mechanical or electrical scanning to obtain different spectral information. Most of the commercialized detectors have no ability to obtain spectral information by themselves. Wavelength division devices, such as a grating, prism, and Michelson interferometer, enable the detection system to identify the light wavelength precisely. However, the spectrum acquisition systems based on them are complex with large footprint and lead to heavy load and looseness[11,12]. They are unsuitable for on-site or portable application areas. To minimize the volume of spectrum acquisition systems, a multi-color detector has been developed by integrating different waveband detection structures vertically to get two or more broadband spectral signals simultaneously[13,14]. However, the multi-color detector is a longitudinal laminated structure with a certain degree of optical and electronic crosstalk. The spectral resolution is too low due to its broadband response. In addition, some filter-free detectors with a tunable narrowband response spectrum have been developed, such as organic photodetectors[1517]. These filter-free strategies have a small footprint, but it is not easy to increase the number of spectral channels to tens or even hundreds. Therefore, a miniature wavelength division device integratable with detectors is the key to reducing the footprint of multispectral and hyperspectral detection systems. To this end, ultra-compact wavelength division devices based on nanophotonic principles, such as metasurface, photonic crystal, and plasmonic structure, have been widely investigated[1825]. For example, researchers bond the photonic crystal slab on the charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detector to form a chip-level spectrometer [2631] in the visible. It remarkably reduces the footprint of the spectrum acquisition system. However, the minimum size of metasurface structure is less than 1 µm. It needs highly precise and high-cost fabrication processes like e-beam lithography, which increases the fabrication difficulty and cost enormously. Additionally, no pixel-level wavelength division devices monolithically integrated with a detector in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) have been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Only a dual-waveband SWIR InGaAs focal plane array (FPA) with broad bands of 46 nm and 54 nm has been developed by integrating two filters [32].

    Zhiyi Xuan, Qingquan Liu, Zhuangzhuang Cui, Songlei Huang, Bo Yang, Chenlu Li, Shaowei Wang, Wei Lu. On-chip short-wave infrared multispectral detector based on integrated Fabry–Perot microcavities array[J]. Chinese Optics Letters, 2022, 20(6): 061302
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